Survey reveals shocking fall in writers’ incomes

on Wednesday, 30 July 2014 15:43. Posted in General

Just 11.5% of professional authors can earn a living from their writing
money

A new survey commissioned by the Authors’ Licensing & Collecting Society has found that increasingly few professional authors are able to earn a living from their writing.

The survey, What Are Words Worth Now?,  of almost 2,500 working writers, was carried out by Queen Mary University of London. It found that in 2013 just 11.5% of professional authors (those who dedicate the majority of their time to writing) earned their incomes solely from writing, compared with 40% in 2005.

The typical (median) income of the professional author has also fallen dramatically, both in real and actual terms. In 2013, the median income of the professional author was just £11,000, a drop of 29% since 2005 when the figure was £12,330 (£15,450 in real terms). According to Joseph Rowntree Foundation figures, single people in the UK need to earn at least £16,850 before tax to achieve a Minimum Income Standard.

In contrast to the sharp decline in earnings of professional authors, the wealth generated by the UK creative industries is on the increase. Statistics produced by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport in 2014 show that the creative industries are now worth £71.4 billion per year to the UK economy (over £8 million per hour) and the UK is reported as having “the largest creative sector of the European Union”, and being “the most successful exporter of cultural good and services in the world”, according to UNESCO.

Owen Atkinson, chief executive of ALCS, commented: “This rapid decline in both author incomes and in the numbers of those writing full time could have serious implications for the economic success of the creative industries in the UK. If writers are to continue making their irreplaceable contribution to the UK economy, they need to be paid fairly for their work. This means ensuring clear, fair contracts with equitable terms and a copyright regime that support creators and their ability to earn a living from their creations.”
Download a summary of the booklet

Peter Whelan 1931-2014

on Friday, 11 July 2014 19:53. Posted in Theatre

By David Edgar

peter-whelanIt’s saddening to report that playwright and Guild member Peter Whelan has died at 82. As fellow RSC associate artists, we met and colluded frequently. He’d had health problems over many years (complications following a hip replacement) and was confined to hospital during rehearsals for his Morris/Rossetti play at the Almeida, The Earthly Paradise. But fellow playwright and Guardian interviewer Samantha Ellis found him working, from his bed, on a new play.

The son of a lithographic artist, Peter was born and brought up in Stoke on Trent, accounting for his fascination with history and pottery. A considerable actor at the Questors Theatre, Ealing, he played Guildenstern in an early version of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, directed by Tom Stoppard himself. But although he always intended to be a playwright, he didn’t start writing till he was almost 40. His first play for the RSC, Captain Swing, was picked up off the mat.

Peter’s subsequent work for the company included The Accrington Pals (being revived this year), Clay and The Bright and Bold Design (both potteries plays) and A Russian in the Woods, based on his national service in postwar Berlin. His best known plays – also for the RSC – were set in the English renaissance. His Marlowe/Thomas Kyd play The School of Night was revived at the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles, and his play about Shakespeare’s daughter Susanna, The Herbal Bed, had runs in the west end and on Broadway (and, with his Birmingham Rep play about the monarchy, Divine Right, won him a Guild best regional play award in 1996). For me, the scene in The School of Night in which the unknown actor Tom Stone is revealed to be Shakespeare (“Two writers under one roof is one too many”. “If you ask me, it’s two too many”. “Especially when there are three”) is one of the great dramatic coups of the contemporary theatre. He also wrote for broadcast (his television work included The Trial of Lord Lucan for Granada).

Peter was no pushover – in or out of the rehearsal room - but his kindness and generosity of spirit shone through his work. Four years ago, we found ourselves pursuing the same subject, and his withdrawal was typically gracious. He was unfailingly supportive to younger writers, and a great friend. The RSC were lucky to have him. Our condolences go to his wife of 56 years, Ffrangcon, and their children.

Celebrating writers: featuring Malcolm Campbell

on Saturday, 05 July 2014 08:24. Posted in Events

What Richard Did

To kick off our occasional series of screenings, we will be showing What Richard Did on 30 July in London, followed by a Q&A with writer Malcolm Campbell.

What Richard Did won Best First Screenplay at the Writers’ Guild Awards (2013). Malcolm has written for some of the UK’s most popular dramas, including The White Queen, Shameless and Skins, as well as creating the BBC’s multi-Bafta-winning L8R and gaining Bafta nominations for All About Me and Losing It.

After the screening, Malcolm will take questions and talk about adapting a novel for the screen.

6pm, 30 July, networking drinks in the hotel bar from 5pm

The Covent Garden Hotel Screening Room, 10 Monmouth Street, Covent Garden, London WC2H 9HB


Price: £8 (Guild members), £10 (non-members)

Bookings: via Eventbrite

Writers' Guild AGM 2014

on Tuesday, 20 May 2014 16:14. Posted in Events

wggb-annual-report-2014All members are invited to the Writers' Guild AGM 10.30am-5pm, 4 July Cluny & Tanner Room, The Bermondsey Square Hotel, Bermondsey Square, Tower Bridge Road, Southwark, London, UK, SE1 3UN

This year’s AGM in London next Friday boasts two high-profile speakers – the new director-in-waiting of the National Theatre Rufus Norris, who will be talking on the theme “the National Theatre and new writing”, and BBC Controller of Drama Commissioning Ben Stephenson. Don’t miss it!

Key documents:

The art and craft of abridgement

on Monday, 16 June 2014 16:09. Posted in Rates and Agreements

Miranda Emmerson explains how she abridges books for broadcast on BBC Radio 4

miranda daviesLike a lot of people who grew up loving books I was always a bit snotty about abridgement. Surely writers’ words are sacrosanct? Abridgement is for people who can’t hack listening to 40 hours of Eliot or reading 800 pages of Tolstoy: the wimps. I wanted all books and plays to exist like untouchable jewels, to reflect and refract exactly as the writer first intended.

And then I became a writer. And I wrote plays and I tore them apart and turned them into something else. I threw characters out of the window and ditched my ‘best’ scenes. I gutted other people’s books and films and histories and lives for reference points and images and ideas that could be endlessly altered, endlessly adapted.

I loved Charles Dickens's Great Expectations, and also David Lean's Great Expectations, and Sherman Yellan’s Great Expectations, and the Great Expectations of the man (whose name I cannot find) who abridged the little 1970s picture book that my father read to me when I was seven. My five-year-old daughter loves A Midsummer Night’s Dream because Mr Shakespeare wrote a good story and Lesley Sims turned it into something that she can read at bedtime.

In the past 14 years I have abridged dozens upon dozens of books and short stories for BBC Radio 4 and Radio 4 Extra: often for the Book of the Week slot. I have abridged history, biography and science. I’ve abridged Lucy Wood and Sebastian Faulks, Virginia Woolf and Ernest Hemingway.

Edinburgh film festival to host crisis summit

on Friday, 13 June 2014 19:02. Posted in Film

The Edinburgh International Film Festival and Edinburgh College of Art are this week hosting the inaugural Scottish Film Summit in a response to the crisis in Scotland’s film industry. The WGGB are participating in this important event.

The summit will engage all sectors of the film industry, from producers, writers and directors, to facilities companies, location managers and crews, to film educators, archivists, trainers and academics, festivals, distributors and exhibitors. The day will have keynote speakers setting out their views on the issues the Scottish film industry should be considering. Key issues on the agenda are likely to include what needs to allow more home-grown films to be made, how to help the country attract more bid-budget films to shoot on location, and ways to reverse a talent drain of film-makers away from Scotland.

This is an opportunity to present the current views and concerns of the industry, and to look at how to build up the Scottish industry post-Referendum. The event is likely to discuss the case for a new permanent film studio in Scotland to help the country compete with existing facilities in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, as well as the impact of the referendum on film-making in Scotland.

According to The Scotsman, the summit has been announced after more than nine months of lobbying from film-makers who warned the industry north of the border was on the brink of disaster because of a lack of support and financial backing from the Scottish Government and arts agency Creative Scotland.

The quango’s chief executive, Janet Archer, will be one of the keynote speakers at the summit, along with Glasgow-born film producer Iain Smith, one of the leading figures involved in an independent group set up last year to campaign for a better deal for the industry.

A damning report into the industry for Creative Scotland found the country was lagging way behind major European rivals when it comes to studio facilities and support for film-makers. It warned that the country did not have enough infrastructure in place to support a successful industry, despite the success of hit films such as The Filth and Sunshine on Leith.

Creative Scotland has won some backing from the industry for appointing its first dedicated director of film, former entertainment lawyer Natalie Usher, and agreeing to up its maximum grant for film productions by 60 per per cent, to £500,000.

The Scottish Government and Scottish Enterprise are studying a number options for the country’s first full-time film studio, with ministers ring-fencing £2 million for a loan fund to help get the venture off the ground.

Attendees to the summit will receive lunch and tickets for the EIFF Opening night film screening and party.

9am-3.30pm,
18 June Main Lecture Theatre,
ECA Main Building, Lauriston Place,
Edinburgh

More information and bookings

Read more in The Scotsman