BBC TV fees increased by 2%

on Wednesday, 29 October 2014 13:55. Posted in Rates and Agreements

The Writers’ Guild has negotiated an above-inflation increase of 2% on all minimum fees for BBC TV. This brings the headline rate for teleplays, shorter scripts and children’s drama and comedy to £188 per minute, or £11,280 for a 60-minute slot. Other key rates are £171 (£10,260) for series/serials and £124 (£7,440) for dramatisations. Television sketch material goes up to £105 per minute and attendance fees are £100 per day.

This compares with a 1% staff pay rise, although in some cases lower-paid BBC staff are receiving flat-rate increases worth between 2% and 3%. The current rate of inflation measured by the Consumer Price Index is 1.2%, and the latest Retail Price Index is 2.3%.

The new rates take effect from 1 November 2014. Writers’ Guild general secretary Bernie Corbett said: “Once again the Guild has given priority to protecting the living standards of our members, and we welcome these increased rates. In addition, earlier this year the BBC introduced a loyalty bonus for many writers on long-running series, and we are still in negotiations for a better deal for writers on the daytime show Doctors. We need to support the BBC and the licence fee system over the next year or two to ensure that funds will be available to make further improvements in writers’ terms and conditions.”

The Guild is currently negotiating with the BBC over plans to change BBC3 into an online-only channel, create a new autonomous company for BBC TV Production, increase payments for the iPlayer, and improve minimum rates for BBC radio writers.

For more details about the new BBC TV minimum rates, follow this link.

So you want to work in videogames?

on Thursday, 02 October 2014 10:59. Posted in Video Games

The UK represents the fifth largest videogames market in the world, but how do you break into the industry, and what sort of jobs are available? And how do a writer’s usual tools (story, character and dialogue) function in a videogame?

The Writers’ Guild and the Royal Television Society are running an event to explore this growing industry, with a chance to ask the professionals your questions. Speakers include Steve Ince, Chair of the Guild’s Videogames Committee.

Steve is a writer, consultant and games designer with 21 years’ experience in the games industry who has enjoyed much success and acclaim, during his time with Revolution Software and as a freelancer since then. His most recent work includes writing dialogue for Godfire: Rise of Prometheus, released earlier this year.

He will be joined by Meg Jayanth, a freelance writer and game-maker, whose work includes the recently released 80 Days – a steampunk, anti-colonial, interactive retelling of the Jules Verne's classic for iOS.

Details of the event follow, but if you are unable to attend, Steve Ince has produced a number of Gamewriter Bites! short videos, including one on how to break into the industry. The full library is available on his YouTube channel.

Date and time: 18 November, 7-10pm
Location: West Yorkshire Playhouse, Leeds LS2 7UP
Price: £5 (waged), £3 (unwaged), free to Guild members
More information and bookings here.

Sherlock wins three BAFTA Cymru awards

on Sunday, 26 October 2014 21:28. Posted in TV

The BBC detective show Sherlock, Britain’s most watched drama series in a decade, has picked up three BAFTA Cymru awards, presented at the Wales Millennium Centre in Cardiff on 26 October 2014.

The TV drama series was co-created by Writers’ Guild member and award-winning screenwriter Steven Moffat, alongside Mark Gatiss, for Hartswood Films. Moffat has also written selected episodes.

The adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s detective stories, starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Sherlock Holmes and Martin Freeman as Doctor Watson, is filmed mainly in Cardiff. Its three series have received critical acclaim, and 12 million people tuned in to watch series three in January 2014 to find out the mystery of the lead character’s apparent death after falling from a rooftop.

Viewers were teased by a special BBC trailer (see the video, above), which suggested Sherlock was in fact alive and well, while Steven Moffat said at the time: “It’s time to reveal the truth about what happened between him and the pavement.”

A Christmas special and fourth series are planned for 2015/16.

Sherlock won the Best Television Drama BAFTA Cymru award; while Arwel Jones won the award for Best Production Design on the series, and Claire Pritchard won an award for Best Hair and Makeup.

London Screenwriters’ Festival: join the Writers’ Guild there

on Thursday, 16 October 2014 09:42. Posted in Events

Over 700 screenwriters, film-makers, producers, actors and execs will attend the London Screenwriters’ Festival on 24-26 October.

The Writers’ Guild is sponsoring the festival, the world’s largest professional screenwriters’ event, which takes place at Regent’s University in central London.

Guild member Mike Leigh (Mr. Turner) will be one of 150 expert speakers, which also include Gurinder Chadha (Bend It Like Beckham), Sally Phillips (Smack the Pony) and David Hare (The Hours).

The schedule includes over 100 seminars, workshops, an evening networking drinks and party, plus the following annual highlights:

• The Great British PitchFest
• Advanced Mentoring Script Labs
• Actors Table Read
• Script Surgery
• Free Legal Advice Clinic

Screenwriters Line Langebek (I’ll Come Running) and Andrea Gibb (Dear Frankie) are co-chairs of the Writers’ Guild Film Committee, which will be hosting a stand at the festival. “We are pleased to be sponsoring this major annual gathering of emerging and established screenwriters and are looking forward to meeting many of them,” they said.

“The Writers’ Guild has a very active Film Committee. We have taken a leading role in an international campaign to have the role of screenwriters recognised at film festivals. We hold networking events with Directors UK, and advise feature film writers on their agreements, options and the process of obtaining funding. We have also joined with producers and directors to lobby for part of the revenues from subsidised films to return to creators for reinvestment in new projects.”

You can buy tickets and view the full festival schedule, which also includes events for writers for TV, online.

From Poland with power

on Thursday, 16 October 2014 08:17. Posted in Events

Fourteen delegates from the Writers’ Guild of Great Britain travelled to Warsaw in October 2014 for the World Conference of Screenwriters (WCOS), joining 29 other guilds and writers' organisations from 19 European countries, plus North America, New Zealand, Israel, Mexico, South Africa and India.

Here they debated, networked, shared experiences, were inspired, empowered and – most importantly – passed two resolutions: calling for true equality of men and women in screenwriting; and placing the creator at the centre of quality TV.

We asked Writers’ Guild delegates to tell us what thoughts they brought home with them. You can read these below, as well as download each writer’s full report.

Bill Armstrong

Bill Armstrong 1(CreditsDoctors, The Indian Doctor)

“If we stand together, within our guilds and national industries and in cooperation with our sister unions across the world, we have more leverage than we think.”

Read Bill’s full report

  

Grant Cathro

Grant Cathro.1(Credits: Which is Witch?, Genie in the House, Mike & Angelo, B&B, Romeo & Juliet, T-Bag)

“Speaking with so many talented colleagues from all across the world has really fired me up, and left me thinking loudly and clearly, ‘Writers, unite!’”

Read Grant’s full report

 

Kate Delin

Kate Delin(Credits: Doctors)

“Real empowerment means trusting the writer, the audience and the idea.”

Read Kate’s full report

 

 

Henrietta Hardy

Henrietta Hardy.1(Credits: Doctors, The Bill, Family Affairs, Casualty)

“WCOS03 was a memorable and life-changing experience. It was incredible to be in the company of so many talented and inspiring people.”

Read Henrietta’s full report

 

Ming Ho

Ming Ho(Credits: Casualty, The Bill, Heartbeat, EastEnders, McCready and Daughter)

Communing with writers from all over the world gave us a chance to see that we share the same challenges.”

Read Ming’s full report

 

Emma Reeves

Emma Reeves0004colweb(Credits: The Dumping Ground, Tracy Beaker, Young Dracula, Sadie J, Doctors, Eve)

“As we British writers continue to struggle for artistic freedom and respect, it is inspiring to know that we’re supported by writers around the world.”

Read Emma’s full report

 

Gail Renard

Gail Renard(Credits: Give Me A Chance, Get Up, Stand Up, The Famous Five, Custer’s Last Stand Up)

“We might write alone but we stand together as one, saying ‘let writers write’.”

Read Gail’s full report

 

 

Alistair Rutherford

Alistair Rutherford(Credits: Backflip, Eight Words, Lift Off, An Island Between Heaven and Earth, Happy New Year)

“To know there are many screenwriters, in the UK and across the globe, who achieve long and successful careers, is inspiring, empowering and highly motivating.”

Read Alistair’s full report

Dead men's teeth and how they inspired me

on Monday, 13 October 2014 13:15. Posted in Books and Poetry

Jamie Rhodes on his latest work, tips for new writers and why he is a Guild member

JamieRhodes“I first realised I wanted to become a writer when I was 11. I went to a fairly rough comprehensive in Bradford and hated music lessons. So I used to sit at the back of the class and read a book. The teacher let me do it as I think he was just happy with one less pupil being disruptive. One day he said to me, ‘Jamie, what happens when you’ve read all the books in the world?’ to which I replied, ‘I will write my own.’

I was lucky in that, even though it wasn't a great school, I had good English teachers who nurtured and supported me. In fact, I have dedicated my first short story collection, Dead Men’s Teeth & Other Stories from Voices Past, to them: Ghislaine Anderton, Terry Binns and Joanna Cowie.

The idea for the collection came about after I started following the British Library’s Untold Lives blog, which features snippets from their vast archives.

I applied for Arts Council funding earlier this year, and was successful. This meant I could devote myself to intensive research and writing for six months. I applied for a British Library reader’s pass (which gives you access to their archives) and spent hours wading through old documents, some of them hundreds of years old.

One of the stories I came across was that of a ship’s surgeon, quarantined for three weeks aboard an indenture vessel stricken with cholera in the 19th century, outside Suriname. I did a degree in philosophy at Manchester Metropolitan University, and in my writing like to explore broader facets of the human condition. So on the surface this is a dark and interesting tale of a man trapped on a ship. On another level it is about the lack of understanding we feel about why we are here, not sure if we are ever going to reach our destination, wherever that is.

I also find inspiration in observing people. One tip I would give emerging writers is get yourself a part-time job that is public-facing in some way. Working in a bar might not be glamorous, but it is a good way to support yourself financially in the early days, and there are lots of opportunities to watch people and notice their mannerisms.

Another tip would be to be open-minded about opportunities that come your way, even if they aren’t what you ultimately want to do. It will gain you experience, and also show agents/publishers that you are serious about your career. My first professional credit was as a screenwriter, on a public service information film. I have also written radio plays, taught screenwriting in schools, worked as a journalist, run career-strategy workshops for writers, and founded the Homeless Film Festival.

I’m passionate about ensuring that marginalised groups are able to benefit from creativity and the arts. Human beings have a unique capacity not only to create, but to appreciate art, and I think everyone should have access to that, whoever they are. It is part of enjoying and exploring the full spectrum of experiences available to us.

Every writer should join the Writers’ Guild of Great Britain, whatever stage they are at in their career. It is the writers' trade union. I joined as soon as I got my first professional credit in 2010, and have been active in the East Midlands and London regions. I’ve been on committees and helped organise events. It’s a great way of meeting other writers, and also the more you put in, the more you get back. And you definitely get taken more seriously by agents and publishers if you are a member.

The London & South East branch of the Guild was with me every step of the way on Dead Men’s Teeth & Other Stories from Voices Past, giving me a letter of support for my application for Arts Council funding, and setting me up with a mentor, writer Caz Moran. She has been fantastic and a huge benefit to my professional development. This really helped me make the leap from writing in script form to writing short stories. It was a big jump but by the end of six months I was producing an average of 8,000 words per week.

The Guild has also helped me promote my short story collection, alongside the British Library, which is keen to show how its archives are far from stuffy. For me, they were a mine of endless fascinating stories, and a seed for my creativity.”

Find out more

Dead Mens TeethDead Men’s Teeth’s & Other Stories from Voices Past is published by Mardibooks. The collection is published in collaboration with the British Library and is funded as part of an Arts Council programme to support emerging writers.

To book tickets for the launch event at the British Library on 20 October, where there will be readings and dramatic performances, visit the British Library website.

Writers' Guild members are automatically entitled to a British Library reader's pass

Jamie Rhodes has produced a video on career strategy for writers: 

What people are saying about the book

“Jamie Rhodes has mined and minted gold from the British Library Archives. Inspired by sources as various as a ship's surgeon's log, verbatim interviews, diaries or even advertisements for false teeth, Rhodes gives us glimpses into unexpected places, the forgotten corners of history, in stories told with the authentic weirdness of truth; touching, quirky and humane.”

Olivia Hetreed, President of the Writers' Guild of Great Britain

“We are delighted that our Untold Lives blog inspired this set of short stories created from the ‘small but beautiful details of real lives’ in the British Library Archive Collections.”

Margaret Makepeace, British Library Curator, India Office Records

Book cover design above by Christa Leask